Category Archives: Terry The Tourist

MelBourne Identity

For five years I promised myself a birthday treat to go to the Australian Open tennis. Finally, after a low key 30th the year previous, I was headed to the hallowed Melbourne Park. Largely in part due to Carolina’s job in marketing and events. Her company looks after a wine brand, one of the Open’s biggest sponsors.

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Doctors of the Quarantine Station

I have been a paying visitor on the Sydney Q Station Ghost Tour at North Head three times; yes, I am a self-confessed history geek and as each year passes, it deepens. The same tour on three occasions, but each time a different guide gives an alternate atmosphere and reveals more about its curious past. It was only on my final tour late in 2014 with family from the UK that prompted this scribble.

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Get Your Fax Right

I guarantee my 19 year-old sister would look at me open-mouthed, frowning if I asked her if she knew what a fax machine was. The long form facsimile according to Wikipedia is, “…from the Latin fac simile or “make alike” and is a copy or reproduction of an old book, manuscript, map, art print, or other item of historical value that is as true to the original source as possible.” Of course in this tech-savvy age we are all digital creatures. In our personal and business lives we live, breathe and consume instant, digital and paperless communication. Even in Australia where the majority of the world’s perceptions are still based on Crocodile Dundee and of course The Simpsons episode when the family travels Down Under, we (naturalized) are surely some of the most advanced people on earth.

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Welcome Back, Yours Intensely, London.

Just a few hours after landing from the monster Sydney to London flight I’m sitting on my Nan’s sofa enjoying a cup of tea. Having gone straight from the airport to the Business Design Centre dragging a tonne of conference gear for the next day’s British Medical Journal Fair, I’m physically spent. But the mental journey was just as intense.

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The War On (Terror) Terry

The blog article below is one of the more light-hearted chapters written early this year from my as yet unpublished book – with the current climate and “terrorism” the talk of the town I thought it might be semi-relevant to post…

The War On Terror Terry

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Wilcox: Leading the North Shore’s quest for food & drink excellence

Having been open just a couple of months the buzz is well and truly surrounding Cammeray’s favourite new haunt Wilcox.

The small bar is exactly that, a narrow space that somehow fits the world and its family in relative comfort. The space is utilised to perfection with a cocktail bar that screams Manhattan followed by a cosy kitchen tucked into the left-hand side that we barely noticed, all resting on a seriously solid dark oak floor. Copper is used to accent the slate black tables but also the wait staff’s water jugs.

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Mexico Part 3: Cenotes, Turtles & Nick’s Land

For some reason I expected a Mexican guide but in bounced the owner of Avatar Adventures, floppy haired Nick, fractionally late but for good reason as another couple had decided to bail on the tour and not wake up when Nick arrived. A bonus for us as we were the only couple on board the bus.

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Mexico Part 2: Casas, Tours & Tacos

Seeing our Mexican, guitar-strumming friend play the exact same song set on the return ferry from Isla Mujeres, we could not wait to jump in our waiting taxi. One hour and 30 minutes later we arrive at Tulum, slowing for and passing various town checkpoints guarded by armed police. As I started to observe, the police and any other civil employee took a very relaxed approach to their jobs.

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Mexico Part 1: Isla Mujeres

The penultimate leg of our honeymoon was the trip south from New York to Mexico. Extremely sad to be leaving the city and the best hotel I’ve experienced, The Bowery, we arrived just a four-hour flight later in Cancun, the party town popular with American students on Spring Break and families looking for all-inclusive resorts and holidays, a Mexican-Miami or Vegas on the beach.

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Hartwood: NYC meets Caribbean

In two weeks in Tulum, Mexico, never did we have to queue for a meal. Until now. With a no reservation policy Hartwood was recommended to us by several friends. Opened in 2010 by New Yorkers just two months ago interest reached phenomenal levels with the release of a New York Times profile. Expectations were high.

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Hug Life: Changing Men One Hug At A Time

I had been meaning to tell this story for a while and as I sit on honeymoon in Mexico by the pool there was ample time to do so. Furthermore two articles that appeared on my Facebook and Twitter newsfeeds over the past week or so made this piece even more relevant. Click on the links below and ideally read them first. The first article came with the “revelation” that Hollywood actor James Franco posted a “selfie” photo on Instagram of him “cuddling” up to a male friend in bed (excuse the excessive use of speech marks). The second article was from news sharing and blogging site sensation The Huffington Post; somehow concluding 93% of men admitted cuddling with another guy (I have no idea of who, where and how many men they asked).

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Eat New York: Top Tips

After notching up three trips to New York in as many years I have been lucky enough to have never had a bad meal (except just one sorry jet-lagged influenced occasion at a Sheraton Hotel in-house restaurant).

My wife Carolina is my de-facto tour planner, her day job is spent organising and executing events so she qualifies for this job and more some.

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Thierry The Tourist

France, and the French, was something I looked upon with suspicion since a child. Much like many places, foods and people I looked down at, listening to the masses’ opinions and experiences. “The French are a rude race of people”, “They eat weird stuff like frogs legs” or “They refuse to speak English”. It probably had something to do with the well-publicised fact the British and French rarely get along and there is a long history of distaste between the two. Spurred on by recommendations and being in London for my honeymoon my wife Carolina and I booked a day-trip to Paris.

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The Real Great Britain

Ever since leaving England, and probably far before that, I became incredibly cynical about the motherland. My personal outlook before I left for the other side of world, my gradual decline into disgust at our military policy and the country’s general negative outlook, to name just a few, festered in me. Ironically I’ve seen little of the land I spent my first 25 years in and only embraced travel when living in Australia and eventually being in an economic situation to do so. I fell for Sydney and it’s been a passionate, unbreakable affair ever since.

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The History of Football In Malaysia

While the tragedy of disappearing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 has dominated the world’s headlines over the past few weeks, the current state of football in the country also remains a mystery. Barring a period of exciting football in the 1970s with an abundance of striking talent, the national team has faded quickly and recent and consistent revelations of corruption across the domestic competition do little to inspire confidence for the future.

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Dressing For Work Pt. 2

Leave sports watches in the gym locker

Unless you are taking part in an office Olympics your luminous green wrist-piece will give you attention for all the wrong reasons. Think about investing in a sharp silver number or vintage style watch that will go well with all suit shades.

Tents should not be a shirt substitute

If you can fit two fully grown men in your shirt then it’s time to look at some more slender options. Wearing over-sized shirts is a common mistake, they may have been 5 for $50 but the square cut has little regard for your shape. Pay close attention to the ‘fit’ of your shirt.

Shoes that resemble football boots

Most people do not cross a swamp to get to the office so your shoes should reflect this. Regardless of price or style a simple wipe with a damp cloth everyday will help. Or go all out and invest in an old-school brush and polish to keep your shoes fresh.

Brown is not black’s best friend

Using the example of shoes, wearing brown footwear with black pants clashes. Contrast is key here, either match them exactly or show enough difference to create an edge.

Wearing creased clothing

This may seem like an obvious point but you might as well be wearing a sack if you are not pressing your suits weekly and donning crisp shirts.

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The Surprising History of Indian Football

India is the world’s second largest nation with a mind-boggling population of over a billion people. Despite this monumental nation they are seen as anything but a global leader when it comes to football, with very few professional players and a national team that fails to make world news. But if we take a deeper look at the history of the game you will find that they were once a powerhouse in Asia, represented by some curious but talented figures and, subject to increased resources and a grand plan, India aim to return to the peak of Asian football.

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Top 4: Stores for the Man about Town

It’s a common complaint that men’s fashion in Australia, particularly Sydney, is poorly catered for and high-street stores have not yet adopted the success of their European counterparts for being reasonably priced and with an abundance of choice. Surf-style shops are of course hugely popular and there are few independent boutiques selling rare items. However there are some men’s stores that might not be as edgy but cater well in their sector for the man about town. Below are four stores that although not spectacular, are a good starting point.

WITCHERY

Owned by their former rival Country Road, in my opinion, Witchery offers more conservative and business like collections but is known more for women’s clothing. The fit and shape of their shirts is more forgiving than its competitors but it has been argued they are overpriced. They do not have a great reputation for their online service so head in store instead.

COUNTRY ROAD

If you thought Country Road’s style was vaguely similar to Witchery then there’s good reason. CR’s current Head Designer used to be Chief Designer at Witchery. Only ten years ago did it become accessible to the ‘middle market’ and it’s ‘Spend & Save’ promotions are extremely popular (especially with my wife). I am not a huge fan of their pedestrian t-shirts but I do buy my summer casual shirts and winter knits from there and recently their durable chinos. Expect a little more colour than what is on offer at Witchery.

MARCS

Although quite similar in design, this brand just sneaks above Saba in terms of prestige and sophistication. It’s slightly more expensive than the previous brands listed but particularly the fit of their clothing, especially their shirts and t-shirts is first class. The quality and material of their ranges means they will last a substantial amount of time and their winter offerings with knits and sweatshirts are impressive.

SABA

There is no surprise that Country Road, Witchery, Marcs and Saba all began in Melbourne. But in recent years Saba has moved his HQ to Sydney. Saba tends to go for a slicker look with plain colours and shades. It shies away from garish patterns with the occasional check and simple stripe. For my profile Saba has the best off-the-peg suits available that fit like a glove. It is not easy on the pocket however but again they employ similar tactics to CR such as ‘Spend & Save’.

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The Unpredictable History of Romanian Football

As some of their Balkan cousins are packing their beachwear for Brazil in under 100 days, Romania remains firmly out in the cold. Despite finishing second in their group and missing out in a playoff against Greece, they finished nine points behind group leaders the Netherlands.

Not that expectation was high; with the country not playing in a major finals tournament since 1998 the national game has fallen down the list of priorities as the domestic game and authorities are found to be among the most corrupt in the world. The promising early rise of football, a huge period of wilderness where potential superstars were kept under wraps and a national golden era post-Communism make up the rich and fading memories of Romanian football.

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A History of Australians In English Football

Last week Lucas Neill, the former Blackburn, West Ham and Everton defender secured a move to English Championship team, and my home town, Watford. With the World Cup on the horizon Neill is desperate to secure regular football to gain a spot on the flight to Brazil. His career has taken him to England, across Europe, back to Australia, Asia and now back to England. It prompted me to think about the history of Australians in the English game and celebrate those that made an impact in the motherland and some that went Walkabout.

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